As the temperatures dip and the days shorten, we at Ann Marie’s are preparing for the cold season ahead. Whether as an accompaniment to hot porridge and maple syrup in the morning, catching up with old friends, or cozying up to a warm fire and a good book, autumn is the time or year we reach for our favorite teas.   And what better way welcome the cold weather and say you care than one of Burleigh’s new gift boxes? Boxes feature either a breakfast or tea cup, saucer and side plate, in Burleigh’s classic prints. Pair with any of Thursday’s Cottage delicious curds and Yorkshire Gold tea for a truly British gift.

 From the elegant Asiatic Pheasants line to the cheerful Calico, Burleigh’s prints are quintessentially British and integrate well into both traditional and modern kitchens. The unparalleled craftsmanship and range of pieces have made Burleigh a favorite at Ann Marie’s and around the world.

William Leigh and Frederick Rathbone joined their talents to form a pottery in 1862. Their names were joined into “Burleigh” in the 1930s, but the techniques have remained largely the same since the pottery’s founding.

Prints are transferred from an engraved copper roller to tissue paper, and from there brushed by hand onto unglazed pieces. Burleigh is the last pottery in the world to use this traditional transfer technique. Each piece is fired three times, and it takes 25 craftsmen contribute to the finishing of each piece. The results are dishes we love, perfect for both entertaining and everyday use.

English Scone Recipe

Taken from cooking.nytimes.com

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups self-rising flour (3 cups all-purpose flour, 1 1/2 tablespoons baking powder and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt can be substituted)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 4 ounces unsalted butter at cool room temperature, more for pan, optional
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon whole milk
  • 1 cup dried currants, optional
  • 1 egg yolk

PREPARATION

  1. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Whisk in the sugar. (Or give all the dry ingredients a quick whirl in a food processor.) Cut butter into bits and work it into the dry ingredients with fingertips or a pastry blender, or by pulsing the processor, until mixture is finely crumbly. If using a food processor, transfer mixture to a bowl.
  2. Gradually add 1 cup milk and the currants, if using, and mix with a fork. Knead lightly by hand to make a smooth dough. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate 20 minutes.
  3. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Grease a baking sheet with butter or line it with parchment paper. Roll dough to a 3/4-inch thickness. Use a fluted 2- or 3-inch cutter to punch out scones. Scraps can be kneaded lightly for additional scones. Beat the egg yolk with remaining milk and brush on the scones. Place on baking sheet and bake 10 to 12 minutes until risen and golden brown.

Check out our selections of Curds and Jams to top off  your hot out of the oven scone at Ann Marie’s.